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"Pithy, witty, funny and on top of the news. What blogs are to political commentary, the Daily Scribble is to the editorial cartoon. I keep coming back for more."  Joshua Micah Marshall, Talking Points Memo.

"Though Charles Pugsley Fincher would do well to find a stage name, his daily scribbles are nothing to scoff at. Plain and simple, on lined yellow scratch paper, yet they speak volumes." Jacob Wheeler, Utne.com.

Scribble runs in the opinion section of Flak Magazine.
By Charles Pugsley Fincher, A Spin-Off of ThadeusandWeez.com
Scribble has been nominated for a Dot.com award for best web cartoon at About.com. If you have time, your vote would be appreciated. .Newest Scribble, below. Check out the brand new Scribble illustrated blog called "Page Two" for more cartoons plus reader political comments. Yesterday's Scribble, Archive: Bush explains secret orders and NSA spying.
NEW CARTOON in Scribble's illustrated Page Two blog: Power to the POTUS plus reader comment.
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Bush: I am not a Dictator Bush's Secret Orders Hokie Pokie Victory Plan Military Spying at Home Bush Doctrine in Philly
NEW CARTOON in Scribble's illustrated Page Two blog: Power to the POTUS plus reader comment.

From WashingtonPost.com:

Clash Is Latest Chapter in Bush Effort to Widen Executive Power
By Peter Baker and Jim VandeHei
Washington Post Staff Writers
Wednesday, December 21, 2005; A01

The clash over the secret domestic spying program is one slice of a broader struggle over the power of the presidency that has animated the Bush administration. George W. Bush and Dick Cheney came to office convinced that the authority of the presidency had eroded and have spent the past five years trying to reclaim it.

From shielding energy policy deliberations to setting up military tribunals without court involvement, Bush, with Cheney's encouragement, has taken what scholars call a more expansive view of his role than any commander in chief in decades. With few exceptions, Congress and the courts have largely stayed out of the way, deferential to the argument that a president needs free rein, especially in wartime.

...For Cheney, the post-Watergate era was the formative experience shaping his understanding of executive power. As a young White House chief of staff for President Gerald R. Ford, he saw the Oval Office at its weakest point as Congress and the courts asserted themselves. But scholars such as Andrew Rudalevige, author of "The New Imperial Presidency," say the presidency had recovered long before Cheney returned to the White House in 2001. The War Powers Act, the legislative veto, the independent counsel statute and other legacies of the 1970s had all been discarded in one form or another.

"He's living in a time warp," said Bruce Fein, a constitutional lawyer and Reagan administration official. "The great irony is Bush inherited the strongest presidency of anyone since Franklin Roosevelt, and Cheney acts as if he's still under the constraints of 1973 or 1974."

Sen. John E. Sununu (R-N.H.) said: "The vice president may be the only person I know of that believes the executive has somehow lost power over the last 30 years."

12.21.05

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